Postwar advertising legacy of WWII

The defense industry is a business like any other, and just like any other industry, advertising is a part of it. After WWII’s end in 1945, many wartime weapons systems remained in Cold War use and required upkeep, upgrading, resale, integration with newer systems, and eventually disposal.

Some of these advertisements ran in general-interest magazines and newspapers. Others were limited to niche defense journals and trade gazettes, and were typically unseen by the mass public.

hazard1971

Above is a 1971 newspaper ad for the disposal of USS Hazard (MSF-240), an Admirable class minesweeper of the WWII US Navy. Typically, smaller mothballed WWII ships like this were bought cheaply in lots by brokers, then parceled out individually to scrapyards for a profit. USS Hazard was bought by a group of Nebraska businessmen and is today a museum ship in Omaha, NE.

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Mothballing the US Navy after WWII: pt.2

(part 2 of a 2-part series)

tunnydecom1946

(The 1945 decommissioning ceremony of USS Tunny (SS-282), showing the blown plastic preservation technique on the deck gun.) (official US Navy photo)

greasing

(Protective grease is applied to machinery on a mothballed warship, in a still from a  post-WWII training video.)

charlestonearly1950s

(Mothballed WWII destroyers at Charleston, SC in the 1950s, with their radars removed and AA guns enclosed in igloos.)

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Merry Christmas

Merry Christmas to all readers of wwiiafterwwii.

zelima

(The stores ship USS Zelima (AF-49) supplying food to the destroyers USS Sproston (DD-577) and USS Nicholas (DD-449) after WWII.)

USS Zelima had been launched as a merchant ship during WWII but completed as a stores ship, commissioning 16 July 1945. After WWII, USS Zelima participated in the Korean War and then the Vietnam War, including the 1969 Tet Offensive. USS Zelima decommissioned in 1969 and was mothballed at the Suisun Bay, CA reserve fleet anchorage. The WWII veteran was never recalled to duty and was sold to Levin Metals in November 1981.

USS Sproston commissioned on 19 May 1943 and fought in WWII. After the war, the destroyer continued in service and was finally decommissioned on 30 September 1968. The WWII veteran was sold as scrap in December 1971 and towed to Taiwan for dismantling in 1972.

USS Nicholas commissioned on 4 June 1942 and fought in WWII including the 1943 Solomon Islands campaign, where the destroyer won a Presidential Unit Citation. In 1944 USS Nicholas sank the Japanese submarine IJN I-38 which itself was carrying Kaiten suicide-attack manned torpedoes. After WWII, USS Nicholas fought in the Korean War where the destroyer earned a South Korean Presidential Citation; making the ship decorated by heads-of-state of two nations. USS Nicholas received a FRAM II upgrade and fought in the Vietnam War, and finally served in NASA Apollo spacecraft recovery missions. The WWII veteran USS Nicholas finally decommissioned 30 January 1970 and was scrapped in Portland, OR later that year.

Below is USS Zelima‘s Christmas 1953 menu.

Zelimachristmas

F8F Bearcat post-WWII service

The F8F Bearcat was the last of a WWII family tree of Grumman carrier-based fighters which started with the Wildcat and led to the Hellcat. It was the fastest carrier-based plane of WWII, the fastest naval piston-powered fighter of the war, and one of the fastest propeller-driven planes of any type of all time.

bearcat2(US Navy F8F Bearcat)

The Bearcat barely entered service during WWII. Only one US Navy squadron, VF-19 aboard USS Langley (CVL-27), was fully operational with the type, beginning in July 1945, and it encountered no combat before Japan surrendered. The F8F was already on it’s way out of American service by the time the Korean War started and saw no combat there either. However the Bearcat did have a very long and successful career with other countries after WWII.

F8F2(French air force F8F Bearcat with drop tank and napalm bombs in Indochina.)

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