About

This is an example of a page. Unlike posts, which are displayed on your blog’s front page in the order they’re published, pages are better suited for more timeless content that you want to be easily accessible, like your About or Contact information. Click the Edit link to make changes to this page or add another page.

Advertisements

21 thoughts on “About

  1. Hi, Please contact me. I seek permission to use a picture from your site for my book on the USM1917 Enfield bayonets. Included is use of the .303 and .30-06 models, the former having been used in the Israeli War of Independence. You have a picture of the rifle used by the Haganah in 1947. Is it available for me to use? As I am within about 6 weeks of committing to print the book, I would especially appreciate if I can impose for a early reply? Thank you, Dan

    BTW – I would be happy tomcat your site in any way as the source.

    Like

  2. Hello. Please note that Italy used SRCM hand grenades (“Red Devils”) of pre-WWII design at least up to the 1990s.
    And please would you add a page on the 1969 “Football War”?? Thanks

    Like

  3. Hi, I’m a huge fan of your blog, and WWI history in general! I am also a WordPress dev, and I would like to talk to you, both about the page and about some WWII weapons and equipment I would love to see you delve into in future installments. Can you email me?

    Liked by 1 person

  4. The most interesting blog I’ve seen in quite a while. Great research and well written articles.
    Since you mentioned Militaryphotos.net in some comments, what was your nick there? And are you on TheMess.net, its (spiritual) successor?

    Liked by 1 person

  5. That’s sad, but of course the photo content of the old forum isn’t there in the new one.

    Re your blog, I had an idea for an article recently:
    “Axis warships in postwar service”
    Could be split up in German, Italian and Japanese ships of course.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Hi, I’m interested in starting a blog/facebook page in a similar format as yours concerning modern African military history as I feel it is an underappreciated topic. Can you recommend any sort of strategies and sources for research, promotion and avoiding copyright issues?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi there, that is an excellent idea. I also am interested in African militaries and agree that it’s very under-published. As far as copyright issues, the biggest thing is (obviously) avoiding direct plagarazation, and photos. For photos, I am careful to always attribute them if I know the source. I try to use public domain when possible. Under federal law, any photo, book, manual, drawing, blueprint, etc done by the government (including the military) is instantly public domain, so there is a wealth of it available. Images are not hard for their copyright owners to guard; there are computer programs which scan the web looking for matches to copyrighted photos so they will find them. As far as defensive copyright, you’d have to clearly state in a header page, etc that your work belongs to you, with your name. I decided not to because I knew people would steal my writing anyways, and sure enough I’ve already found parts of WWII After WWII copied onto wikipedia. Anyways for researching African military history, I know of a book series called Africa At War by Helion & Company publishing that covers the whole post-WWII period up into the collapse of Zaire at the end of the 1990s. There’s at least two dozen volumes and they are inexpensive. They are not exhaustively in-depth, but always a good start. Another resource I use is the SIPRI Arms Transfer Database which is online, free, and public-domain. You enter in a selected country, a selected time frame, and it lists all the weapons exports to that country in a spreadsheet. If you get your project up and running let me know, I’d like to subscribe.

      Like

  7. Dear friend, great site you have here !
    A French friend publishing in CIBLES would like to contact you. His name is Julien (julienleveque78@yahoo.fr) about the Jungle carbine … would you mind contacting him directly ?
    Thanks
    Gus Gintz
    Mariginiup WA 6078
    Western Australia

    Like

  8. I stumbled across this site while doing some online research and have been quietly going through the magazine quality articles since (about two days, now). Wonderful little site/project you’ve got going here. Part of the research I was doing, relating to a small alt-history monograph I’m putting together, was to find info on what happened to all the StuG IV (c. 1139 produced) and Jagdpanzer IV (c. 2000 produced) that must have survived the war. I realize that most would have ended up behind the Iron Curtain but a good number were also use against Allied forces in the European Theatre and should have been captured in Italy, France, the Low Countries and (West) Germany – for instance, some 135 JgPz IV/70’s took part in the 1944 Ardennes Offensive along side the much less numerous Jagdpanther, which also seems to have quickly disappeared. Any light you might be able to shed on the matter, or hint as to where I might find such info, would be appreciated.

    J.G. Shea
    Edmonton, Cda

    Like

    • Almost all of the German tracked vehicles that survived the war were scrapped. Small batches were operated by Romania and Czechoslovakia for a short while (3-4 years) and France operated a unit called the Besnier squadron for a year or two.

      Like

      • I suppose that the ready availability of all that surplus American equipment, either privately or through MAP, would make even the best German stuff, most of it well used, somewhat redundant. Seems odd that more Panthers and King Tigers didn’t end up in circulation but the only nations using ex-Wehrmacht equipment were those barred from acquiring US surplus – except for Turkey and France. Spain and Finland had bought new directly from the source while the Balkan states either had leftovers or, like Syria, were provided war-booty from the Soviets – though Spain, France and Czechoslovakia did produce their versions of some German aircraft.

        Like

  9. Hey man! I’ve always been impressed with your site, extremely well done.
    I wanted to get in touch with you over your article about Western and Winfield Arms as a broker for the CIA in post WW2. I’d like to blog about it for The Firearm Blog, quote/link to you directly, in addition, use some of the photographs you have up. Our readers would really find your article fascinating!

    Please let me and I hope to be in touch!

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s