sunset of naval netlaying after WWII

Some changes to the US Navy after WWII were both readily apparent and abrupt. The carrier-based warplane replaced battleship gunnery as the most potent offense at sea. Smokescreen-laying, an important art for destroyer captains in 1939, was more or less moot ten years later due to the near-universal fitting of radar on warships. And so on.

The decline of naval defensive nets after WWII was neither fast, nor with a simple explanation. In the US Navy the discipline sort of just quietly went away, slowly, over a period of about 15 – 20 years…yet, the decline was unmistakable even as soon as WWII’s end in 1945.

Little is said as to how or why naval nets vanished, or what happened to the US Navy’s many net warfare ships after WWII. So perhaps this will be of value.

pinoncherbourg

(USS Pinon (AN-66) hauls in a German anti-submarine net at Cherbourg, France following the city’s liberation during WWII.)

butternut

(An inert Polaris ballistic missile being launched in 1963 from a buoyant test cylinder tended by USS Butternut (AN-9), a WWII veteran net ship.)

seperacion1990s

(The Dominican Republic navy’s SeparaciĆ³n, which had been USS Passaconaway (AN-86) during WWII, during the 1990s.)

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flow of WWII weapons after the war

Since starting wwiiafterwwii, I have wanted to do something on this topic but was unsure how to approach it. I am interested in how WWII weapons performed in battle against Cold War replacements. But also, it is fascinating to consider how they ended up where they did after WWII……how did a Garand built to fight Imperial Japan end up in the Somali desert in the 1970s, or how did a Waffen-SS sturmgewehr end up in 21st century Damascus?

interarmco

(An ex-Wehrmacht NbW 42 Nebelwerfer with Interarms markings in the 1960s.)

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Uphold Democracy 1994: WWII weapons encountered

The USA invaded Haiti on 19 September 1994, unopposed by the Haitian military. The operation, named “Uphold Democracy”, was to reverse a 1991 military coup which deposed the freely-elected president, Jean-Bertrand Aristide. During the operation, American forces recovered a large amount of WWII weapons which were still in use by the Haitians.

Sept1994coverrifles1994

(above: The cover of the September 1994 issue of Time magazine, and a Haitian armorer’s rack of WWII-issue M1 Garand rifles secured by the US Army’s 10th Mountain Division during the 1994 invasion.)

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